Saturday, 22 May 2010

Lakenheath Fen


Like many others Lakenheath Fen in Suffolk has drawn me to it's wonderful surroundings and on Wednesday i visited, the first time since August last year! The photo above was pretty much the general view around the reserve for most of the day as people flooded in to catch a glimpse of Golden Oriole....a glimpse would've been great! Unfortunately there wasn't even a semi-glimpse for me as i just couldn't spot any even with my new bins trained closely on a tree that one was definitely fluting from! Ah well, can't win 'em all! The rest of the birdlife was extremely good though, enjoy...

Almosty stepping out of the car park and checking the first pond allowed me to see this female Reed Bunting who was bringing back nesting material to a nest just below a bank in some reeds


Reed Warblers were everywhere, their familiar call all over the place although they seemed to less inclined to perch out in full view, unlike the Reed Buntings who love a good pose!




This 4 Spotted Chaser is one of the earlier Dragonflies out n' about, i only spotted one of them but got this photo whereas i saw loads of Hairy Dragonflies without managing anything! Love Dragonflies....like mini monsters that bring back the kid in you!


The reserve is currently a great place to hear Cuckoo's, i saw plenty of people and went into chatty mode with some of them, a few middle aged "new to birdwatching" types told me this was the first time they've ever heard Cuckoo let alone see one! Crazy! I suppose if you spend alll your life stuck in the city this must be a breath of fresh air...literally! Unfortunately i couldn't manage any Cuckoo-in-tree photos but did grab a couple of in-flight shots as they whizzed past me, very sparrowhawk like...




Sedge Warblers are another one of them birds that Lakenheath has plenty of, and because the paths run directly alongside reedbeds you stand a pretty good chance of getting decent shots of them, also they have this nice habit of sitting at the very tops of vegetation and singing away, again extremely helpful when you want to take photos of them!







This is a Crane.


I can only blame this crappy photo on the fact that it was very far away, there was a big heat haze, i didn't have my camera ready, my lens isn't very long, it was moving so fast, loads of people were in my way, the sun wasn't in the right position......who am i kidding, it's a Crane, i probably wont get better than this!

I will however take full credit for these excellent Hobby photos! To be fair, the reserve has about 40-50 of them at the moment and it was only a matter of time before 1 of them swooped down low enough, it was just a simple matter of pointing the camera at it and giving myself a pat on the back! Lovely birds...






Large Red Damselfly - Pyrrhosoma nymphula for those into scientific names

Awww....cute baby swans.....awwww.............ok that's enoug


Whitethroat


Sedge Warbler in flight....running through the air kinda thing!


Answers on a postcard, what is this caterpillar species?


And the same goes for this bird, female Reed Warbler or Garden Warbler?!

Overall a really nice day and well worth a look for anyone interested! Bitterns were also BOOMING,Bearded Tits pinging about, Cetti's being Cetti's and Marsh Harriers were around so plenty more to see. I would recommend getting there earlier than i did (9.30am), maybe 6am-ish....that way you get more Oriole looking time (they sing best in the mornings), avoid the crowds a bit more and get more time there which is a good thing!

2 comments:

  1. Hi mate,

    great post - deffo going there next weekend and hope I get some nice weather!!

    the mystery catty is a drinker moth caterpillar and that looks like a reed warbler - garden warbs always seem like they have stubby bills to me and this looks rather long!

    Dan

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  2. Hi Ben,

    def Reed Warbler - the easiest feature from your pic is the long and extensive undertail coverts, extending a long way towards the tail-tip.

    Great blog, lovely photos.

    Mark

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